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STAT

An MUSC blog
Keyword: telemedicine

Nurse practitioner Kelli GarberMUSC Health School-Based Nurse Practitioner Kelli Garber led a special live event for Nurse's Week on the free case-sharing app Figure 1, answering questions about telehealth from health care workers worldwide.

If you missed the live event, you can view the transcript here (free Figure 1 registration required).

Read more about her work with school-based telehealth here.

On May 10, MUSC Health’s School-Based Telehealth Nurse Practitioner Kelli Garber led a live event for Nurses Week on Figure 1, a free case-sharing app (iOS and Android)  used by over a million  health care professionals. Through the Center for Telehealth’s school-based telehealth program, Garber provides care to children in rural Williamsburg County and other areas of the state. Read more about her work here. During this special live event, known as a Figure 1 on 1, Garber answered questions in real time from health care workers worldwide bout her important work and her passion for nursing. Download the free app (Android or iOS) to view a transcript of the event. Or you can also access Figure 1 on the web (figure1.com) but will need to create a free account to view the event.

Photo of veteranA study among military veterans needing psychotherapy for depression has demonstrated that such therapy delivered via telemedicine in patients’ homes achieves outcomes that are not significantly inferior to those of traditional in-person clinical encounters.1 In their editorial in the August 2015 The Lancet Psychiatry, Hoge and Rye describe this study as the kind of rigorous clinical trial that is necessary to establish acceptable standards of care, calling it “a vanguard of demonstration of safety and efficacy of in-home telemental health.”  All research team members were affiliated with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) or the Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Charleston, SC. The Principal Investigator was Leonard E. Egede, M.D., Professor of Medicine at MUSC, Director of the MUSC Center for Health Disparities Research, and the Director of the Charleston VA HSR&D Health Equity and Rural Outreach Innovation Center. In the 2007 - 2011 study (NCT00324701), 204 veterans aged 58 years and older were treated via either telemedicine or same-room treatment. Their response to the treatments did not differ significantly. The researchers’ interpretation of this data, which is in the same issue of The Lancet Psychiatry2, is that evidence-based psychotherapy delivered to patients in their homes is not only not inferior, it is advantageous because it overcomes distance, attendance, and stigma barriers faced by some veterans. "This is the first study in the elderly that shows that in-home telemedicine works as well as face-to-face sessions for the treatment of depression,” says Egede. “It provides strong evidence for using in-home telemedicine to treat depression and possibly other mental health conditions in those with stigma or mobility challenges, the home-bound, or those who are geographically isolated and cannot get to care easily. In addition, there were no adverse events, which have always been a concern for mental health treatment delivery via telemedicine.”

1 Egede LE, Acierno R, Knapp RG, et al. Psychotherapy for depression in older veterans via telemedicine: a randomized, controlled, open-label, non-inferiority trial. The Lancet Psychiatry 2015; 2(8): 693-701.

2 Hoge, CW, Rye, CB. Efficacy and challenges of in-home telepsychotherapy. The Lancet Psychiatry 2015; 2(8): 668-669.

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