brain optics graphicIn 2015, the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) focused on three priority areas: the complexity of the brain, clean energy, and food security. After reviewing nearly sixty applications, the NSF awarded eight awards to the tune of $42 million in early August. Only three of these awards were for brain research, and MUSC was a recipient. A $4 million grant to MUSC will be used to develop and implement new optical technologies to image brain function at a very high resolution. The Principal Investigators of the grant (Peter W. Kalivas, Ph.D., and Prakash Kara, Ph.D., both from the Department of Neurosciences at MUSC) felt that partnering with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) played an important role in securing this grant. UAB and MUSC will bring complementary technologies to develop a parallel pipeline of state-of-the-art brain scanners in both states. Optical technologies previously used to look at the stars in the sky will now be miniaturized to look inside the brain. Additional partners in this grant include Furman University, the University of South Carolina Beaufort, and Clemson University.

The NSF recognizes the importance of funding new research projects that merge science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Grant recipients must also develop a STEM workforce in order to grow their research programs. While the NSF funds basic science research, this infrastructure often leads to new discoveries that improve health care. For example, this grant thematically focuses on developing tools to determine the precise mechanisms (on the microcircuit scale) by which neurons normally communicate with blood vessels in the brain. However, this “neurovascular” communication breaks down in many neurological diseases. Thus, this grant will have far-reaching impacts in the fields of neuroimaging, neurology, and neuroscience education.