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Keyword: nursing

Nurse practitioner Kelli GarberMUSC Health School-Based Nurse Practitioner Kelli Garber led a special live event for Nurse's Week on the free case-sharing app Figure 1, answering questions about telehealth from health care workers worldwide.

If you missed the live event, you can view the transcript here (free Figure 1 registration required).

Read more about her work with school-based telehealth here.

On May 10, MUSC Health’s School-Based Telehealth Nurse Practitioner Kelli Garber led a live event for Nurses Week on Figure 1, a free case-sharing app (iOS and Android)  used by over a million  health care professionals. Through the Center for Telehealth’s school-based telehealth program, Garber provides care to children in rural Williamsburg County and other areas of the state. Read more about her work here. During this special live event, known as a Figure 1 on 1, Garber answered questions in real time from health care workers worldwide bout her important work and her passion for nursing. Download the free app (Android or iOS) to view a transcript of the event. Or you can also access Figure 1 on the web (figure1.com) but will need to create a free account to view the event.

Nursing motherIn the October 2015 issue of Pediatrics, two MUSC Children’s Hospital faculty members—vitamin D researcher Bruce W. Hollis, Ph.D., and neonatologist Carol L. Wagner, M.D.—reported clinical trial findings definitively showing that sufficient vitamin D can be transmitted via breast milk to meet the needs of the exclusively breastfed infant, provided that the mother is adequately supplemented.

Breastfeeding is encouraged by the medical community in part because breast milk meets all nutritional needs of the child, with the glaring exception of vitamin D. Why such an essential vitamin would be missing from breast milk has always been puzzling. Many physicians erroneously believe that vitamin D simply cannot be transmitted via breast milk. To prevent deficiency in exclusively breastfed babies, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that they be supplemented with 400 IU/d of vitamin D3, delivered via liquid drops. Unfortunately, the drops can be difficult to administer and not all mothers adhere to this directive, leaving some infants vulnerable to rickets or fractures.

The study results reported by Hollis and Wagner suggest that a more natural and effective way to supplement the child would be to adequately supplement the nursing mother.  At the time the study was designed, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended that adults, even nursing mothers, receive 400 IU/d of vitamin D3; the IOM has since increased the recommended dose to 600 IU/d. The study randomized mother/infant dyads to either 400 IU/d of vitamin D3 each or 6,400 IU/d for the mother and none for the infant. The infants in both arms of the trial achieved vitamin D sufficiency, and no adverse effects were reported for mothers receiving the 6,400/IU day dose.  The results suggest that adequate maternal supplementation—6,400 IU/d of vitamin D3 vs. the current IOM recommendation of 600 IU/d—offers a safe and effective alternative to direct infant supplementation.

fowler - terriThe MUSC College of Nursing’s online graduate nursing program was recently ranked number one in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Ninety six nursing programs were scored on factors such as graduation rates, academic and career support services offered, and admissions selectivity. MUSC earned an overall score of 100.  College of Nursing Dean Gail Stuart, PhD, says the achievement “is a reflection of the dedication of our faculty and staff.” 

The College of Nursing began its asynchronous online program in 2006 with the Master of Science in nursing (MSN) and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), followed by the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) in 2009, and the Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in nursing (RN-BSN) in 2014. There are currently almost 300 students enrolled in the online graduate programs.  

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