Skip Navigation
request an appointment my chart notification lp musc-logo-white-01 facebook twitter youtube blog find a provider circle arrow
MUSC mobile menu

STAT

An MUSC blog
Keyword: cardiovascular disease

MUSC Awarded Four Million Dollar Grant to Study Health Disparities in Stroke Recovery

Stroke disparities blog post imageAfrican Americans are more likely to both experience a stroke and be more adversely affected by it than their white counterparts. In South Carolina, the buckle of the stroke belt, African Americans are twice as likely to die from stroke when compared to whites. Less well known is that recovery after stroke is poorer for African Americans than whites, and that access to rehabilitation (or lack thereof) does not completely account for this discrepancy.

With the support of a four million dollar grant from the American Heart Association (AHA), the largest AHA grant ever given to an institution in South Carolina, MUSC is endeavoring to improve stroke recovery in African Americans through a multidisciplinary project that brings together basic and translational researchers in regenerative medicine, neuroscience, and nursing. The four-year project, entitled Wide spectrum Investigation of Stroke Outcome Disparities on Multiple Levels (WISSDOM), includes research projects with the potential to not only improve our understanding of why African Americans don’t fare well in recovery but to use those insights to make a difference in the lives of stroke patients through community interventions.

Leonardo Bonilha, M.D., Ph.D. (photo, left), and Mark Kindy, Ph.D. (photo, center) of the College of Medicine and Gayenelle Magwood, Ph.D., R.N. (photo, right) of the  College of Nursing are all principal investigators of the subprojects being conducted through WISSDOM. Kindy is exploring whether known stroke risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes that disproportionately affect African Americans also play a role in their recovery from stroke. To do this, he will study the effect of such metabolic factors on vascular stiffness in animal models. Bonilha is using innovative neuroimaging techniques to assess the integrity of brain tissue and neuroplasticity (i.e., the ability of the brain to repair itself) in black and white patients so that questions about why African Americans have poorer stroke recovery than whites can be answered. Magwood is exploring whether a community-based intervention—a 12-week home-based intervention coordinated by a nurse and delivered by a community health worker— can improve stroke recovery after patients finish with rehabilitation.

As Director of WISSDOM, Robert Adams, M.D. will oversee the four-year project in its entirety and serve as its key contact. Daniel T. Lackland, Ph.D., a long-time collaborator of Adams who has devoted his 30-year career to addressing disparities in South Carolina and beyond, will serve as WISSDOM’s Training Director, and Bruce Ovbiagele, M.D., Chair of Neurology, as the head of its advisory committee.

This grant builds upon the 10.8 million dollar COBRE (Center Of Biomedical Research Excellence) grant awarded last year to MUSC to found the South Carolina Stroke Recovery Research Center. The COBRE grant is led by Steve Kautz, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Health Sciences Research and Co-Director of the Center for Rehabilitation Research. (Read more about the COBRE grant here).

Photograph courtesy of Sarah Pack. 

photo of a box of fruits and vegetablesA recent study led by MUSC professor David P. Turner, Ph.D. finds that lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise could affect the progression of cancer and the rate of survival, but so could race. According to the study published in Cancer Research in May, our bodies have to metabolize food to obtain the sugars we need, thus leaving behind a reactive-metabolite waste product. These leftovers are referred to as advanced glycation end-products (AGE), and this study addresses the apparent correlation between AGE levels and the prevalence of age-related diseases among non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. 

High levels of AGE are associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, and cancer. These levels are highest in African American men with prostate cancer—they are 1.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with this cancer and twice as likely to die from it than non-Hispanic whites. Consumption of sugar and processed food can contribute to AGE levels. Food preparation (i.e., browning) also plays a large role in these levels. They are higher in the West, where the diet commonly consists of red meat, refined grains, and high sugar and fatty foods.

 When analyzing serum from cancer patients, Turner found that AGE levels were significantly higher in patients with cancer than those without. Breast and prostate immortalized cancer cell lines grew more, migrated farther, and invaded more when treated with AGE. In conjunction with higher AGE levels, African Americans have more C-reactive protein (CRP), making them more susceptible to chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is one of the key factors implicated in the development of cancer, along with oxidative stress, an increased immune response, and the presence of AGE.

AGE cannot be completely eliminated, but levels of circulating AGE can be lowered. Simply changing lifestyle habits can slow down the accumulation of AGE in the body. Avoid food with high protein, sugar, and fat, as well as processed foods. Then increase your intake of natural grains, fruits, and vegetables. Change the way you prepare your food by cooking meats at a lower temperature for a longer period of time, skipping the browning step of a dish. You can also replace high-sugar, oil-based marinades with lemon juice, vinegar, and tomato juice. The last big step of lowering your AGE levels is exercise. A sedentary lifestyle only allows for more AGE to accumulate.

Subscribe to Progressnotes

Submit a Story Idea


Current Issue of Progressnotes

Digital EditionPDF | Home

Progressnotes - Spring 2017 cover thumb

Back Issues of Progressnotes

past issues of progressnotes