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Keyword: youth athletes

By T. Ryan Littlejohn, ATC, CES
Certified Athletic Trainer
MUSC Health Sports Medicine

Does your son or daughter play sports? According to the Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, three out of every four families have at least one child playing school sports. This leads to another very important question: does your child have adequate medical coverage at their school? Having an athletic trainer or other qualified medical person onsite to address athletic injuries is essential for every school. According to the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine, high school injuries account for an estimated: two million injuries; 500,000 doctor visits; and 30,000 hospitalizations a year. Furthermore, the CDC reports more than half of these injuries can be prevented and, many of these injuries are overuse injuries. Overuse injuries are caused by athletes not resting enough from their sport causing repetitive trauma to their body. A certified athletic trainer is a highly-qualified medical professional that can address these issues and many other athletic injuries. They are able to treat a variety of sports injuries and help keep the cost of medicine down, reducing hospital and doctor visits. Athletic trainers are trained in areas of prevention, rehabilitation, evaluation assessment, immediate care, and organization administration. This includes responding to emergencies by providing CPR and calling 911 when necessary. The statistics for injuries are alarming; however, it can be addressed by having adequate coverage for these athletic events. Hiring an athletic trainer is essential for every school’s athletic program and if there is some doubt look at these statistics; providing coverage alone, could bring a lot of peace of mind to many parents.

By Kathleen Choate, ATC, CSCS, CEAS
Athletic Trainer
MUSC Health Sports Medicine

When I was growing up, children were not allowed to work out in the weight room of my local gym until they turned 12. There were fears that resistance training would damage undeveloped joints and that there were no actual benefits. Research has shown that was false. Participating in sports generally puts more stress on joints than lifting does.  We also now know that while kids naturally gain strength as they grow older, the strength gains from resistance training go beyond that of natural growth and development.2

Benefits

There are many benefits for children who weight train including improved athletic performance, muscle strength, bone strength, decreased risk of injury while playing sports, decreased body fat, improved insulin sensitivity, and enhanced cardiac function.1, 2

Is My Child Ready?

Don't go setting your kids loose in the weight room just yet! Check these boxes off your list to see if your child is ready to start resistance training.

  • My child listens and follows directions well.
  • My child wants to resistance train.
  • My child is not participating in too many other activities.

Getting Started

If your child met the above requirements, there are precautions to take to keep them safe in the weight room. The biggest key word here is supervision. The person who is designing and supervising these workout sessions should know and follow guidelines for strength training children. Kids should be taught proper technique and should be corrected with every lift until their form is perfect. A breakdown in technique will lead to an injury, which is especially true when the weights start getting heavier. Be sure to also teach them about general safety including avoiding pinched fingers and dropped weights.

Big Muscles!

Big muscles should not be a goal with children who are weight training, because it's just not realistic. Increases in muscle mass will start to be possible once they start going through puberty and have more hormones.2 Until then, you can still expect to see gains in strength, but this will be due to improvements in coordination and muscle fibers learning to contract more efficiently.

Injuries

Injury can still happen, even when you tried to do everything right. Be prepared to recognize and respond to a possible injury. Some signs of an injury include pain, swelling, loss of motion, and weakness. Ask yourself why this is happening. Was it the technique, too much weight, a growth spurt, poor program design, or something else? Don't be afraid to ask a medical professional for help.

With all of this in mind, letting your child resistance train can be a positive and beneficial experience. Once again, please make sure they are supervised by an appropriately trained professional.

For more information visit MUSC Health Sports Medicine.

References

1. Faigenbaum, A. D., & Myer, G. D. (2009). Resistance training among young athletes: Safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 44(1), 56-63. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2009.068098
2. Haff, G. G., & Triplett, N. T. (2016). Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

 

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