Skip Navigation
request an appointment my chart notification lp musc-logo-white-01 facebook twitter youtube blog find a provider circle arrow
MUSC mobile menu

MUSC Health Blog

Keyword: stroke

Guest Post by:

Thomas DiSalvo, M.D.
MUSC Health

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an uncontrolled epidemic among American women of all ages. The American Heart Association statistics are staggering:

• One out of every three American women dies from CVD

• One American woman dies every 80 seconds from CVD and stroke

• CVD causes more deaths in American women than all forms of cancer combined

As sobering as these statistics seem, the opportunities for healthy change and the prevention of CVD lie before us each and every day. Our cardiovascular system is wonderfully durable, reliable and hardy – if we only nourish, exercise and cherish it in the choices we make during life. Cultivation of heart healthy behaviors, habits and lifestyle choices can prevent 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events.

The MUSC Health Heart & Vascular Center is privileged to be a local sponsor of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign. This partnership is aligned with our vision at MUSC Health to lead health innovation for the lives we touch and our mission to preserve and optimize human life in South Carolina and beyond.

Please read along to meet several of our wonderful MUSC Health women patients. Their courage and resiliency are models for us all.

Working together, we can lighten the crushing burden of CVD for an American woman. We can live fuller, longer, more vigorously and less fearfully, free to enjoy our work and our families more mindfully.

Read In Celebration of Second Acts: Charleston Women Share Stories from the Heart.

May is American Stroke Month. Why is American Stroke Month important? Because every 40 seconds, someone in America has a stroke. Because stroke is the leading cause of severe, long-term disability.

A stroke—or brain attack—occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted either by a blood clot or burst blood vessel in the brain. Stroke is a serious medical emergency. When someone recognizes a stroke and acts fast, the patient has a greater chance of receiving life-saving treatment to reduce the risk of brain damage and disability.

Can you spot the signs of a stroke? It might make the difference between life and death or between a full recovery and permanent disability.

Think F.A.S.T.:

F - Face drooping: Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile.

A - Arm weakness: Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S - Speech difficulty: Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?

T - Time to call 911: If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 911 and get them to the hospital immediately.

At the MUSC Health Comprehensive Stroke Center, our stroke specialists have one of the fastest times in the country for treating stroke patients with clot-busting medication or necessary medical procedures.  With one of the nation's largest teams of top stroke and cerebrovascular specialists supported by a full range of leading-edge technology and facilities, our patients receive care available only at the most elite neuroscience medical centers in the country.

If you spot signs of a stroke, act F.A.S.T. and choose MUSC Health for the best stroke care in South Carolina.

May is American Stroke Month, and MUSC wants to help increase stroke awareness and educate South Carolinians that stroke is largely preventable, treatable and beatable.

Do you know how to spot the signs of a stroke?

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke. When you can spot the signs, you'll know that you need to call 9-1-1 for help right away. F.A.S.T. is:

  • F: Face Drooping – Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person's smile uneven?
  • A: Arm Weakness – Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • S: Speech Difficulty – Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?
  • T: Time to call 9-1-1 – If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you'll know when the first symptoms appeared.

Time is brain. New treatments are available that greatly reduce the damage caused by a stroke--but you need to arrive at the hospital within 60 minutes after symptoms start to prevent disability.

MUSC's Comprehensive Stroke Center services include the latest in surgical and minimally invasive interventions, telemedicine outreach, on-site emergency care, on, stroke-specific hospital units and trained staff.

May is American Stroke Month, which is the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s annual campaign to increase stroke awareness and to educate Americans that stroke is largely preventable, treatable and beatable.

At MUSC, we are working hard to end stroke and are excited to offer a free community stroke awareness health fair on Thursday, May 22, from 10 am to 2 pm at the MUSC Horseshoe, located at 165 Ashley Ave.

The team from the MUSC Comprehensive Stroke & Cerebrovascular Center will be providing free screenings and information, including:

  • Consultations
  • Blood pressure readings
  • Cholesterol & blood sugar screenings (no food 3 hours prior to cholesterol screening, if possible. Limited to first 40 attendees)
  • Nutrition information
  • Weight management
  • Speech therapy
  • Occupational & physical therapies
  • Diabetic education
  • Stress management
  • Smoking cessation
  • REACH MUSC / telemedicine information
  • Stroke research opportunities

Download an event flyer here. This health fair is open to the public. We hope to see you there!

 

Share Your Story

Subscribe to the Blog