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Keyword: nutrition
Dr. Candi Jump and family
Dr. Candi Jump and family 
Photo provided by Emily McGinnis Photography

“I grew up on the Jersey Shore, but probably not the Jersey Shore you are thinking of,” laughs Candi Jump, pediatric gastroenterologist at MUSC Children’s Health. While slightly joking about her New Jersey connections with her persona of calm and casual, anyone who has a child with GI issues knows that she is a very serious and accomplished physician when caring for these children.

Having been at MUSC and in Charleston now for three years, Dr. Jump could not imagine a more perfect setting for her and her family. She always knew she wanted to teach on some level and proudly states, “I come from a family of teachers – my mom, sister, and aunt are all in education, and I knew that my career choice would involve teaching. My role at MUSC Children’s Health has allowed me to do just that.”

“Working at MUSC in pediatric healthcare has given me the opportunity to give back to the next generation of physicians. I can be a mentor, as well as closely involved in academic medicine at the same time. I also love caring for kids and always knew pediatrics would be my path in medical school. Now, as the program director of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Fellowship Program, I have the opportunity ability to fulfill all of my passions.”

When she is not running around after her kids on the beach or treating patients at MUSC, Candi is not afraid to explore all of the adventures Charleston has to offer. One week, it may be Charleston Power Yoga, the next it’s surfing, or maybe checking out the newest “place to be” on James Island with friends. One thing is certain — Candi Jump knows how to soak up the sun and enjoy an active lifestyle in the Lowcountry. When asked how she envisions a perfect Saturday in Charleston she smiles and says, “That’s easy; morning yoga, brunch with the family, and a day on the beach – it doesn’t get much better than that.”

While fun in the sun is important, Candi is very serious about her role as a physician. She completed her residency and chief residency at the University of Connecticut in Hartford. She then went on to complete her training as a fellow in pediatric GI at the world famous, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. After training, she opted for a closer-knit academic center in a desirable location. MUSC Children’s Health in Charleston fit the bill, and the rest is history.

Candi and her husband, an avid surfer and surf artist on James Island, love the coastal life of the Lowcountry. The family can often be found hanging beach side at Folly with their two kids, Cooper and Ruby, and their rescue lab, Moose. With two toddlers and a dog in tow, Candi is never sitting still for too long. Her office is filled with images of small kids and the beach, illustrating her life as a mother and wife. As a physician, her life is equally fulfilling as evidenced when she speaks of the children she treats and the other physicians with whom she is privileged to work. 

“What I value most about what I do at MUSC Children’s Health is the impact that our pediatric GI group has in this community. There is such a large need for pediatric GI providers in the state, and I enjoy working with such an accomplished group of physicians who are passionate about what they do.”

Candi Jump is among that group of passionate doctors and we are very glad the beaches of Charleston charmed this incredible physician away from the Jersey Shore.  

Guest Post by:
Jennifer Hunnicutt, MS, ATC
Athletic Trainer
MUSC Health Sports Medicine

Following sports injuries, we know the basic healthcare regime: rest, ice, elevate. We know what to put on our bodies, but do we know what’s best to put in our bodies? Nutrition is a very important, yet often neglected, part of recovery from injury.

First let’s address what happens after an injury. Inflammation immediately occurs to stimulate the healing process. Your cells are producing chemicals to clean up the area and prevent further injury. Inflammation can last several days to weeks, however, excess or long-lasting inflammation is not a good thing. Small injuries can become chronic if we do not take care of our bodies. Unfortunately, many foods we eat cause inflammation within our bodies that slow the healing process.

While you are recovering from your injury, eat foods that are wholesome and natural. Find high-quality meats, fruits, and vegetables that will support your body while it repairs the injury. Avoid processed foods. Watch out for excess dairy, a food group known to cause inflammation. Limit alcohol consumption, as it has been shown to slow healing following muscle injury. Supplement your diet with lean protein to maintain muscle mass, especially when your injury requires surgery and/or immobilization.

So how do you know if you are eating the right foods? Consider keeping a food diary. Take notes of what foods make your feel better (or worse). Do you notice that a particular food increases the pain in your injury? If so, avoid it. Bring your food diary to your appointments to discuss your diet with a healthcare professional.

If your injury causes you to go from very active to less active, then you are going to be expending less energy each day. Thus, you may want to consider lowering your caloric intake to prevent weight gain. If possible, find another type of physical activity to maintain your cardiorespiratory fitness, even if it’s just walking. Lastly, ensure you are getting plenty sleep in order to give your body the energy it needs to recover.

The National Athletic Trainers’ Association follows a “food first” philosophy: look for ways to supplement your diet through wholesome foods, such as high-quality proteins and vegetables, rather than pills and ergogenic aids.

Always talk to your doctor before adding supplements to your diet. Be careful of products that promise faster healing. Just as there is no quick fix to enhance performance, there is no quick fix to recovery from injury. Recovery takes time, so let’s provide our bodies the best possible environment through a nutritious diet and healthy lifestyle. MUSC’s comprehensive sports medicine team of doctors, athletic trainers, and physical therapists can provide the guidance you need following your injury. Ask how you can improve your diet and lifestyle to promote recovery following your sports injury.

References

Buell JL, Franks R, Ransone J, Powers ME, Laquale KM, Carlson-Phillips A. National Athletic Trainers’ Association position statement: Evaluation of dietary supplements for performance nutrition. Journal of Athletic Training. 2013;48(1):124–136.

Turocy PS, DePalma BF, Horswill CA, et al. National Athletic Trainers’ Association position statement: Safe weight loss and maintainance practices in sport and exercise. Journal of Athletic Training. 2011:46(3):322-336.

Guest Post by:
Lindsey Clarke
Athletic Trainer
MUSC Health Sports Medicine

It’s that time of year again; time to pace ourselves through the slow roll of successive holidays from late fall through the New Year where we partake in the revelry the season brings. Who doesn’t love the parties, holiday events, gift shopping, and holiday breaks spent with loved ones? While disruption of normal routines and #treatyoself can lead to holiday weight gain, it doesn’t necessarily have to mean all is lost as long as you have a game plan for your merriment.Array of party food

“When what to my wondering eyes should appear? But an extra ten pounds on my hips, thighs, and rear.” Ten pounds over the holidays…are you serious?!?! According to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine, this frequently reported number is grossly over-estimated. They report that the average weight gain from mid-November to mid-January was actually less than 1 pound.

The takeaway here? You’re not going to gain massive amounts of weight from a few holiday indiscretions; our bodies just don’t work that way. But, if you let the one or two pounds from each holiday season accumulate, they can add up over time. Many of us overindulge over the holidays, hoping that our January 1 resolutions will put us back on a healthy track again. Making resolutions is the easy part; it’s the sticking to it that takes hard work. Don’t put that kind of pressure on yourself; establish a plan to get yourself through the holidays making good choices, and setting yourself up for success in any goals you set for the New Year. Start making realistic holiday health resolutions now, so you can cruise into the New Year happy and healthy.

Don’t hold yourself to such strict standards that you can’t enjoy the celebration. Beating yourself up over slips from your plan is no fun for anyone. Follow the tips below to avoid falling into the “I’ve already ruined my diet/healthy eating today” landslide.


Party Game Plan

  • Consume protein beforehand.  This will satiate you, and helps prevents overeating or binging due to hunger.
  • Don’t stand next to the food table.  Fix yourself a plate and remove yourself from temptation. This also helps prevent mindless grazing.
  • Be selective. Choose things that look extra special or are your favorites. Don’t eat something just because it’s there.
  • Be mindful of the number of alcoholic beverages you partake in. Alcohol is just empty calories. And let's be real with each other…overconsumption can lead to poor dietary choices. “Pass the celery” said no tipsy party-goer ever.

Marathon shopping excursions can lead to poor snack and/or meal choices and less than ideal grab on the go fast food. A little planning can keep you from face planting into a food court buffet.

Shopping Game Plan

  • Stay hydrated! People often mistake thirst for hunger. Water can also keep you feeling full.
  • Eat a good breakfast with protein and fiber. This will give you the energy you need to carry all those shopping bags and help prevent mindless snacking.
  • Pack smart snacks. Nuts, dried fruit, apples, and beef jerky all travel well.
  • Plan ahead and meal prep before you leave for the day. This is the perfect opportunity to use that new slow cooker recipe you’ve been wanting to try; add a nice salad and dinner is served!
  • Don’t park in the closest spot; parking farther away just increases your step count for the day.

Getting creative with your activity can take the doldrums out of sticking to your regular workout routine. Use your family and your surroundings to make your holiday workouts fun!

Activity Game Plan

  • Being one of four siblings, I know family competition is alive and well! Create fun activities for the entire family to do. Who can rake the biggest leaf pile or shovel snow from their side of the driveway the fastest?
  • Take advantage of your surroundings. Strap onto your snowboard, cross-country skis, or spend the day sledding and snowball fighting. We lucky Charlestonians can burn calories walking or running out along one of our beautiful beaches or enjoy the views from the Ravenel Bridge.
  • Sign up for holiday races. Many cities host Reindeer Runs or other seasonal races. Make it a family affair or just get your squad together and get moving!

It's perfectly fine to miss a day (or two or three) of exercise, eat your favorite holiday foods, and enjoy a festive drink. The important thing is that you don't let it turn into weeks – and then months – of no exercise or unhealthy eating. If you accept going in that there will be some sidesteps from maintaining/adhering to your newfound or established habits, you'll be better prepared to get back on track and move and groove right into 2017!

Wishing you and yours a happy and healthy holiday season from the MUSC Health Sports Medicine team!!

Guest Post by:

Lindsey Clarke, MS, ATC, CMT
Athletic Trainer;  Massage Therapist Charleston Battery
MUSC Sports Medicine

It’s that time of year again…no, not yard work or taxes, but time for the 38th annual Cooper River Bridge Run.  People from all over the world flock to this event to enjoy the beautiful views of Charleston, participate in a world class distance running event, and spend the better part of the day with 40,000 of their closest friends.  There is A LOT going on for this race…many uncontrollable variables that just make shake the most seasoned runner.  Paying attention to your nutrition is the one variable that day you will have complete control of.  Running a race takes preparation, strength, and energy, and how you approach your pre-race eating plan can affect all three. Throughout training, your diet plays a significant role in helping you perform and recover. In the weeks leading up to the race and immediately before the event, a correctly balanced pre-race nutrition plan will contribute towards your best performance.  If you are a professional, world class runner, or just decided to get in on the action and signed up last week, here are a few tips on giving yourself everything your body needs to have a successful and enjoyable race.

WEEK PRIOR: Moderate quantities of carbohydrate-rich foods will fill your glycogen stores throughout the week leading up to the race. Depending on the length of your race, shoot for about 3-5 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight per day, with foods like oatmeal, potatoes, carrots, and other vegetables. For example, a 150-pound adult would need at least 450 grams of carbohydrates per day. Many runners focus so much on getting enough carbohydrates that they don't pay enough attention to their protein consumption. Protein is used for some energy, but mostly in repair of tissue damaged during training. Again, depending on your training/length of race, you should consume .5 to .75 grams of protein per pound of body weight.  Good sources of protein are fish, lean meat, poultry, beans, nuts, whole grains, egg whites, low-fat milk, low-fat cheese and some vegetables.  Being a long distance race, you’ll want to aim for the higher amount of carbohydrate and protein per pound body weight.  This is the time to experiment with discovering which foods work best for you, and which foods you want to avoid…experimenting on race day is never a good idea!

DAY BEFORE: Many beginning runners hear that “carbo-loading” before a race is a good idea and mistakenly overindulge on enormous portions of carbohydrate-rich foods. Gone are the days of indulging in stacks of pancakes or sitting down to an all-you-can-eat pasta bowl.  Instead, continue eating as you have in the week leading up to the race, increasing your intake of up to 5.5 grams of carbohydrates per pound of body weight; a 150-pound adult would need up to 825 grams of carbohydrates. Foods with a moderate to high glycemic index are your best choices before a race. Eat foods like whole-wheat pastas, which contain 40 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per dry cup serving, and vegetables.

MORNING OF:   As a 10K(6.2m), this race is considered a long distance race.  For longer races, your body will require more fuel.  With an 8am start, a more substantial meal is warranted approximately 2 hours prior to start, so set that alarm just a little extra early.  In addition to your meal, it is good practice to have a light snack 1 hour prior to the race. While it may be tempting to run into the Duncan Donuts on Coleman Avenue while waiting for your heat’s start time, bring a granola bar, energy chews, GU, etc. as a option for more sustained energy release and a lower possibility for GI distress.

In making food choices, it’s always best to stick with what you know works. No one wants any surprises waiting in cue or during your run!  A well-rounded diet of lean meats, legumes, dairy, fruits, and vegetables is a great way to set your self up for success come race day. Some foods to include in race preparation are:

*Whole grain pastas, brown rice     *Lean proteins; salmon, chicken

*Fresh fruit          *Fruit/Vegetable juice                   *Oatmeal

*Bagels                  *Yoghurt drizzled with honey       *Toast with nut butter

Some foods to avoid in race preparation are:

*Cruciferous vegetables; broccoli, cauliflower     *Sugar-free items/artificial sweeteners

*Bran; cereals, muffins     *Caffeine(unless you regularly consume)

*Fried foods     *fatty meats/high fat cheeses     *alcohol

Another extremely important and often forgotten about component of pre-race preparation is proper hydration practices. Many runners underestimate how much fluid they actually lose during their runs and don't drink enough while they're running as well as post workout/race. The result? Dehydration. This is detrimental to performance and dangerous for your health. In the days leading up to your race, you’ll know you’re properly hydrated if you void a fairly large volume of pale urine at least six times a day. On the day of, drink 8-16oz. of water one to two hours before the race, and then another 4-8oz just before. Consumption will vary depending on the length of your race.

LENGTH OF RACE:

ONE HOUR OR LESS
Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. Water is usually fine. For a tougher runs over 30 minutes, consider a sports drink to replace electrolytes and glycogen.

ONE TO FOUR HOURS
Three to six ounces every 15 to 20 minutes. A sports drink with carbohydrates and electrolytes will replenish sodium.

OVER FOUR HOURS
Three to six ounces of sports drink every 15 minutes, after which use thirst as your main guide (drinking more if you're thirsty and less if you're not).

POSTRUN
Replace fluids, drinking enough so you have to use the bathroom within 60 to 90 minutes after your run(approximately 8-24oz).

Whether you cruised effortlessly across or stumbled through and promptly found a nice patch of grass to flop down on in Marion Square, you’ve finally made it across the finish line!  So what comes next? Post race practices are very important in regards to recovery. Replacing fluids lost and replenishing glycogen stores are crucial and the window of opportunity is small.  It is best to consume a recovery ‘meal’ within the first 30 minutes after completion of the run. The optimum ratio is 3:1 carbohydrates to protein.  Depending on your preference, this meal can take the form of nutrition bars, recovery sports drinks, or even chocolate milk.   There are numerous sponsors that provide fantastic goodies such as yoghurt, peanut butter crackers, bananas, oranges, and more for all runners, so there is certainly no excuse in consuming your post-race snack and replenishing fluids lost.  For longer runs, you should also take in a full meal within 2 hours of completing your race that contains lean proteins, carbohydrates, and maybe even a post-race treat…you deserve it!  This attention to detail in your meals leading up to your race will definitely take a bit of planning, but getting the proper nutrition for pre and post race will not only help your performance and recovery, but will make the experience over all much more enjoyable and successful!

Guest Post by:
Robert A. Glass, M.D.
Internal Medicine
MUSC Health

Raise your hand if you have ever tried the latest fad diet or extreme workout plan to lose a few pounds quickly. Almost everyone has. With the obesity problem in America reaching epidemic proportions, the airwaves and bookshelves are filled with people purporting to have the latest and greatest method for shedding those unwanted pounds.

The unfortunate part of most folk’s approach to weight loss is that it focuses on the short term and not on the facts that we know about the physiology of weight gain and loss. Despite what the specialty weight loss clinics and infomercials may tell you, sustained weight loss is only a product of consistent effort and lifestyle change. Fortunately, your local MUSC Physicians Primary Care clinic has access to all the tools you need to start making the scale go the right way.

Personalized Nutrition Plans

The basic physiology of weight loss dictates that the number of calories put in must be less than the number of calories used. From portion size to number of vegetable servings per day, it is vital to have a comprehensive nutrition plan that ensures you are taking in both the proper type and amount of calories each day. Meeting with a certified MUSC nutritionist is a wonderful experience for most patients that shows them exactly what their grocery list and dinner plate should look like, and many find that it jump-starts their weight loss and lifestyle change efforts.

Get Up

While diet control is the lynchpin to losing weight, consistent exercise is the key to keeping that weight off. Many folks can use a fad diet for three to four weeks and lose weight, but almost none can sustain that diet for a lifetime and keep weight off over the long term. Exercising for at least one hundred and fifty minutes per week is a great start to establishing a healthy pattern that will allow you to lose weight and then keep it off for years to come. Many people seek assistance from professionals to help structure their exercise plan. The MUSC Wellness Center has a multitude of programs for people of all ages and skill levels to get you moving in a fun and non-judgmental atmosphere. You can even meet with personal trainers to develop completely personalized exercise plans.

Medication

Though medications are not a long-term solution for weight loss, they can be used to jump-start your weight loss program. There are multiple FDA-approved medications that your MUSC Physicians Primary Care provider can discuss with you. Certain conditions, such as high blood pressure, may limit which medications can be used, but one can usually be found if a patient is interested.

Surgery

Though it may seem like an extreme measure to some, weight loss surgery in the right patient can be very effective. Many people with large amounts of weight to lose can experience excellent benefits with weight loss surgery. Quite often, successful bariatric surgery can also lead to improvement or even resolution of such diseases as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Your MUSC Physicians Primary Care physician can tell you if you meet basic qualifications to schedule an appointment with an MUSC weight loss surgeon.

These four avenues just brush the surface of what is available through MUSC for those looking to lose weight. Obesity has never been a greater problem than now, and MUSC Physicians Primary Care is ready to help you in every way possible to make that morning trip to the scale a much better experience. Once the pounds start coming off, you will be able to live the life you wanted and truly get up every morning to get down.

 

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