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Ebola, or Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), is a rare but deadly illness that is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. Ebola was first discovered in Africa in 1976, and the virus has emerged in several African counties over the years. Most recently, the Democratic Republic of Congo declared an Ebola outbreak in May of 2018.   

The CDC lists typical Ebola symptoms as fever, severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, fatigue, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, and unexplained bleeding or bruising.

Ebola Ebola, or Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), is a rare but deadly illness that is widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. Ebola was first discovered in Africa in 1976, and the virus has emerged in several African counties over the years. Most recently, the Democratic Republic of Congo declared an Ebola outbreak in May of 2018.   Symptoms: fever, severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, fatigue, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, and unexplained bleeding or bruising. Sources: who.int, cdc.gov

How To Protect Yourself from Ebola

While Ebola is very rare in the United States, Ebola is considered widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. According to the CDC, if you are visiting or living in a place where Ebola is widespread, there are ways to protect yourself and prevent the spread of the virus. When in an area affected by Ebola:

  • Avoid contact with blood and bodily fluids
  • Avoid items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or bodily fluids
  • Avoid funeral rituals that require handling the body of someone who died from Ebola
  • Avoid contact with bats and primates or blood, fluids, or meat from those animals
  • Avoid meat from an unknown source
  • Avoid contact with semen from a man who had Ebola until you know the virus is gone from the semen

 

 

Travel Medicine at MUSC Health

Travelers from Charleston can stay healthy before, during, and after a trip with MUSC Health Travel Medicine services. Our infectious disease doctors specialize in protecting you against health risks you may face when traveling abroad. While an Ebola vaccine is not currently available, one of the best ways to avoid getting sick is to get vaccines for diseases that are common in the areas you are visiting. You can also schedule an appointment with an MUSC Health primary care doctor about your travel plans and schedule any necessary vaccinations.

MUSC Global Health

MUSC is also working toward creating healthier communities all over the world through the MUSC Center for Global Health. Our work includes research to find new solutions to global health problems, collaboration with experts around the globe, educating the next generation of global health leaders with hands-on clinical work in other countries, and improving care in developing countries through medical missions with MUSC doctors, nurses, and medical students.

Sources:

http://www.who.int/

https://www.cdc.gov/

Sun Salutation in Moderation: How to protect your skin in sunny Charleston

The sun salutation which means “to adore” is a signature Yoga pose that pays homage to the sun. Throughout the summer many of us will become “sun worshippers,” offering up our own salutations on the beaches of Charleston, South Carolina. Making sure we protect our skin from sun damage while we enjoy the beach (or any outdoor activity) is the key to maintaining healthy skin.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control there are a number of rituals we can adopt to protect ourselves from the sun’s damaging rays.

Sun Safety Rituals

Sun Safety Rituals: Shade, Hat, Clothing, Sunscreen

Shade – Stay out of the sun by finding or creating a shady spot. Shade offers shelter from the harmful UV rays. It also reduces your risk of skin damage and skin cancer.

Hat – Block the sun from areas we often forget by covering your ears, face and neck with a wide-brim hat! Remember dark colors offer more UV protection.

Clothing – covering your skin with clothing that covers your arms and legs can block some of the UVA and UVB radiation. Look for long sleeve shirts and long pants with UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor).

And of course – sunscreen. Sunscreen, or sunblock, is one of the simplest ways to reduce your risk for skin cancer, burns, and wrinkles. Be sure that you pay attention the SPF level and the expiration date for your sunscreen. An SPF of 15 or above is recommended. And expired sunscreen may not offer optimal protection.

Finally, be sure to practice your sun worship in moderation.

MUSC Health Dermatology in Charleston, SC

If you are interested in protecting your skin, getting your annual checkup, or improving your skin health and appearance, MUSC Health offers both cosmetic dermatology  and medical dermatology in 8 locations throughout the Lowcountry. Learn more about your skin health options by visiting MUSC Health Dermatology online or by calling 843-792-8282.

 

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