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MUSC Health Blog

Keyword: brain-spine-stroke

May is American Stroke Month, and MUSC wants to help increase stroke awareness and educate South Carolinians that stroke is largely preventable, treatable and beatable.

Do you know how to spot the signs of a stroke?

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke. When you can spot the signs, you'll know that you need to call 9-1-1 for help right away. F.A.S.T. is:

  • F: Face Drooping – Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person's smile uneven?
  • A: Arm Weakness – Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • S: Speech Difficulty – Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "The sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?
  • T: Time to call 9-1-1 – If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you'll know when the first symptoms appeared.

Time is brain. New treatments are available that greatly reduce the damage caused by a stroke--but you need to arrive at the hospital within 60 minutes after symptoms start to prevent disability.

MUSC's Comprehensive Stroke Center services include the latest in surgical and minimally invasive interventions, telemedicine outreach, on-site emergency care, on, stroke-specific hospital units and trained staff.

May is American Stroke Month, which is the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s annual campaign to increase stroke awareness and to educate Americans that stroke is largely preventable, treatable and beatable.

At MUSC, we are working hard to end stroke and are excited to offer a free community stroke awareness health fair on Thursday, May 22, from 10 am to 2 pm at the MUSC Horseshoe, located at 165 Ashley Ave.

The team from the MUSC Comprehensive Stroke & Cerebrovascular Center will be providing free screenings and information, including:

  • Consultations
  • Blood pressure readings
  • Cholesterol & blood sugar screenings (no food 3 hours prior to cholesterol screening, if possible. Limited to first 40 attendees)
  • Nutrition information
  • Weight management
  • Speech therapy
  • Occupational & physical therapies
  • Diabetic education
  • Stress management
  • Smoking cessation
  • REACH MUSC / telemedicine information
  • Stroke research opportunities

Download an event flyer here. This health fair is open to the public. We hope to see you there!

There is new hope for epileptics whose seizures are not controlled with medication. The FDA recently gave pre-market approval to the NeuroPace System, a responsive neurostimulator device that works to detect abnormal brain activity and respond by delivering imperceptible levels of electrical stimulation to normalize brain activity before an individual experiences seizures.

Dr. Jonathan Edwards, Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and Erick Gordon a patient who participated in the NeuroPace clinical trial
Dr. Jonathan Edwards, Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and Erick Gordon a patient who participated in the NeuroPace clinical trial
Dr. Jonathan Edwards, Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center and Erick Gordon a patient who participated in the NeuroPace clinical trial

Erick Gordon knows better than most the impact this device approval can have on people with epilepsy.  Erick participated in the clinical trial of the device at MUSC and has seen dramatic improvements in his quality of life.

To learn more about the NeuroPace System, how it changed Erick’s life, and why Dr. Jonathan Edwards, Director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center is so excited about this FDA approval and it’s possibilities for people  not only with epilepsy but potentially other neurological disorders in the future visit the MUSC Newsroom.

Mickey, a 3 year-old who had case of Bobble-Head Doll Syndrome, a rare condition that resulted in him bobbing his head constantly in a “yes-yes” motion was treated at MUSC this summer.  WCBD Channel 2 joined Mickey, his Mom and Dr. Sunil Patel for this follow-up visit in the news story below.

WCBD-TV: News, Weather, and Sports for Charleston, SC

To learn more about Bobble-Head Doll Syndrome and Mickey’s case, read the story in the August 2013 edition of Progress Notes and watch an interview with Dr. Patel.

 

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