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Keyword: 10k

Guest Post by:
Stephanie Davey, ATC
Certified Athletic Trainer
MUSC Sports Medicine

Congratulations….you’ve made the decision to sign up for the Cooper River Bridge Run.  If it’s your first 10 K or you’ve run in all 39 Bridge Runs, it’s a big commitment.  Hopefully by now, you’ve started your training and you might have felt a few aches and pains.  There are a few tricks and tools that can help alleviate the injuries that can slow you down.

Shoes

The great thing about running is that it doesn’t take much equipment.  Finding the right shoes is probably the most important thing to do before you start.  The wrong pair of shoes can cause foot, shin, knee, hip, and back pain.  Visit your local running store and talk to a qualified sale person.  They should analyze your feet and running mechanics and then suggest the correct shoe for you.  The most expensive or prettiest shoe is not necessarily the best for you.  Also, pay attention to the wear on your shoes.  You need to replace your shoes every 300-500 miles.

Foam Roller

You may have seen professional athletes rolling over a log like piece of hard foam.  Foam rolling is a form of myofascial release that can help relieve tight muscles and increase mobility and flexibility.  Increased mobility and flexibility will aid in preventing injuries. Foam rolling can take some coordination but aim to work on each body part for 45-60 seconds.  Roll your calves, hamstrings, glutes, quadriceps, IT bands, and back.  This can be done at any time, but is especially beneficial after your runs.

Ice

Unless it’s a hot and humid Charleston day, the thought of icing is not particularly appealing.  Unfortunately, icing can be the best way to relieve your pain after a run.  Icing can reduce inflammation, decrease muscle spasm, and help control pain.  There are a few effective ways to ice.  For the very brave and those looking to ice multiple body parts, the ice bath is the most effective.  Fill your bath tub with cold water and ice.  The temperature should be 50-60 degrees.  Sit in your tub for 10-15 minutes.  For small areas such as the bottom of your foot and your shins, ice massage is particularly effective.  Fill a paper cup with water and freeze it.  When it’s completely frozen through, tear the edges of the cup away and massage the treatment area.  This can be done for 5-7 minutes.  If you’re suffering from plantar fasciitis, you can also use a frozen bottle of water and roll your foot over it.

And don't forget MUSC offers a full range of care through the Sports Medicine Department should you have more troublesome problems with your athletic pursuits.

Guest Post by:
Stephanie Davey, ATC
Certified Athletic Trainer
MUSC Sports Medicine

bridge river run image
Runners Ready for the Cooper River Bridge Run

So you’ve decided to run a 5K or 10K race. There are a few things to consider before you start your training. First, select a quality running shoe. Find a reputable running store to have your foot properly fitted. Many shops have treadmills and will let you run in them prior to purchasing them. The shoe should fit you and your specific foot needs.

 

Second, you need to decide when and how long you need to train. If you’re new to running, you should start you’re training program eight weeks prior to the 5K race. There are many training plans available online to help guide your training. Every good running program should include running, strength training, stretching, and rest. Depending on your fitness level, you can start with a run/walk program. These programs slowly increase running while decreasing the walking until you’re running the entire time. Strength training should be balanced between lower extremity, upper extremity and core exercises. A proper strength training program will not only make you stronger and faster, but it will also aid in injury prevention.

Stretching should happen both before and after your workout. Start your workout with gentle dynamic stretching to warm up your body. These stretches should not only warm your muscle, but should also start to slowly raise your heart rate. After your workout, plan on at least ten minutes of gentle cool down stretching. Give special attention to your calves, hamstrings, quadriceps, hip flexors, and gluteus muscles. These muscles do most of the running work and are the most prone to injury.

The last part of your training program is rest. Depending on your mindset, it could be the most important part. You should have one to two non-running days built into your program. If you do two days, one of these days can be easy cross training such as cycling, the elliptical trainer, yoga, or Pilates. The second day could include some gentle stretching. Rest helps keep your body fresh and injury free.

Unfortunately, injuries are part of running. While not all are preventable, most injuries can be prevented with a proper training program. If you start to have pain, listen to your body. You can modify any program by adding cross-training or rest days. If an injury lingers, consider seeing an orthopedic doctor for a diagnosis and specific plan to rehabilitate.

Hopefully, you enjoy your training. If you don’t, find a way to modify it. That could mean finding a training partner, or finding a new location. If you normally run on a treadmill, try running outside. Running groups are popping up all over the place. These groups usually have varied interests and have runners at all levels. A group can not only make running more fun but will help hold you accountable!

 

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