Skip Navigation
request an appointment my chart notification lp musc-logo-white-01 facebook twitter youtube blog find a provider circle arrow
MUSC mobile menu

MUSC Health Blog

Date: Mar 2018

By Kathleen Choate, ATC, CSCS, CEAS
Athletic Trainer
MUSC Health Sports Medicine

When I was growing up, children were not allowed to work out in the weight room of my local gym until they turned 12. There were fears that resistance training would damage undeveloped joints and that there were no actual benefits. Research has shown that was false. Participating in sports generally puts more stress on joints than lifting does.  We also now know that while kids naturally gain strength as they grow older, the strength gains from resistance training go beyond that of natural growth and development.2

Benefits

There are many benefits for children who weight train including improved athletic performance, muscle strength, bone strength, decreased risk of injury while playing sports, decreased body fat, improved insulin sensitivity, and enhanced cardiac function.1, 2

Is My Child Ready?

Don't go setting your kids loose in the weight room just yet! Check these boxes off your list to see if your child is ready to start resistance training.

  • My child listens and follows directions well.
  • My child wants to resistance train.
  • My child is not participating in too many other activities.

Getting Started

If your child met the above requirements, there are precautions to take to keep them safe in the weight room. The biggest key word here is supervision. The person who is designing and supervising these workout sessions should know and follow guidelines for strength training children. Kids should be taught proper technique and should be corrected with every lift until their form is perfect. A breakdown in technique will lead to an injury, which is especially true when the weights start getting heavier. Be sure to also teach them about general safety including avoiding pinched fingers and dropped weights.

Big Muscles!

Big muscles should not be a goal with children who are weight training, because it's just not realistic. Increases in muscle mass will start to be possible once they start going through puberty and have more hormones.2 Until then, you can still expect to see gains in strength, but this will be due to improvements in coordination and muscle fibers learning to contract more efficiently.

Injuries

Injury can still happen, even when you tried to do everything right. Be prepared to recognize and respond to a possible injury. Some signs of an injury include pain, swelling, loss of motion, and weakness. Ask yourself why this is happening. Was it the technique, too much weight, a growth spurt, poor program design, or something else? Don't be afraid to ask a medical professional for help.

With all of this in mind, letting your child resistance train can be a positive and beneficial experience. Once again, please make sure they are supervised by an appropriately trained professional.

For more information visit MUSC Health Sports Medicine.

References

1. Faigenbaum, A. D., & Myer, G. D. (2009). Resistance training among young athletes: Safety, efficacy and injury prevention effects. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 44(1), 56-63. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2009.068098
2. Haff, G. G., & Triplett, N. T. (2016). Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Providers utilize telehealth to assess patient
Providers utilize telehealth to assess a patient.

J. Antonio Quiros, M.D., director of the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology at MUSC Children’s Hospital, has announced the addition of service providers in the Beaufort, S.C. office and plans to add tele-nutrition services in North Charleston beginning in March.

Quiros, who started seeing patients in Beaufort two months ago, said that Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (PNPS) Jennifer Beall and Karen O’Brien will now be available in the Beaufort location twice a month and GI telemedicine also has expanded to two days each month.

Beall and O’Brien are pediatric GI veterans.

Jennifer Beall is a PNP in the Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Program department at MUSC. She earned her master’s degree in Pediatric Primary Care at MUSC’s College of Nursing in 1998.  She is board-certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner by the American Nurses Credentialing Center.  Jennifer has worked in the Pediatric GI division since September of 2012 and is a member of the Association of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses.

Jennifer treats children with a variety of general gastrointestinal disorders including celiac disease, chronic abdominal pain, constipation, encopresis, GERD, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, and failure to thrive. She has a special clinical interest in the area of bowel management.

Karen O'Brien is a PNP in the Gastroenterology and Nutrition department at MUSC. She earned her master's degree in nursing in pediatric acute and chronic care from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA in 1993. She is board-certified as a primary care pediatric nurse practitioner by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Karen has many years of experience working as a primary care pediatric nurse practitioner then specialized in pediatric gastroenterology.  She is a member of the Association of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses.

Karen takes care of patients with general gastrointestinal disorders including; celiac disease, failure to thrive, functional gastrointestinal disorders, constipation, encopresis, gastroesophageal reflux, eosinophilic esophagitis, and childhood obesity. She has a particular interest in pediatric nutrition.

Tele-nutrition Services Added in North Charleston

MUSC Children’s Health is expanding access to registered dieticians in the GI Department in mid-March in the North Charleston office with plans to expand so that all outpatient locations will have dietician access.  Services are already available in the Mt. Pleasant and downtown offices.  The added service eliminates the need for patients to travel to multiple locations to receive consultations from their dietician.

Three registered dieticians support GI pediatric patients.  The dieticians will follow the scheduled appointments of the day five days a week and support patients in-person or through telehealth.  Dieticians offer consultations to a variety of patient needs including malnutrition intervention, g-tube follow-ups, food allergies, diet education, motility, liver disease and other gastro maladies.
 

 

Share Your Story

Subscribe to the Blog